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****** Cave in Pennsylvania

Oh, it’s that time of year I suppose. My brain is completely absorbed with caving. To be more precise, the locating of caves.

I am starting to believe it is the research portion that gives me the greatest satisfaction. The knowing that something is out there, having the most general of ideas of where it is located, then taking those details and starting the search.

Little bit by little bit a picture starts to form. New information makes itself available, leading to new searches. Exhilerating. Making the first phone calls and contacts, the awkwardness of it, random call from a random person asking about something so random. Wondering if they put it together…put together the fact that you have been staring at maps of their property for hours, even days sometimes. That you could step onto their property¬†and walk to any tree line or rock outcropping from memory. That you can visually see their property in your head any time you like.¬†That you google their name and now know details about their life, all in the search for something that they may see as trivial. Bizzare, awkward.

So this is where I am at. I have a new interest, a new cave. This one, and I am not giving the name out yet, sits 25 feet down a vertical drop, that is the entrance. The cave itself is quite small, just one large room as far as I can tell from the map that I have of this system from the late 60’s. The interesting thing is the water. There is a pond within this cave. There is a pond AND there is some underwater cave portions! And there in lies the extreme. There in lies the draw….for me at least. I am not cave certified (as a diver), but have a friend that is, so I contact him. He is quite interested, and gives me some background on his experiance with cave diving and sumps in Pennsylvania. I also contact a local Grotto to ask for some updated info. An article in particular, written many years ago, by the two guys, and only two that I know of, who have put tanks in the water in this cave. They say they will help find the old article in the archives, and that there may be a newer article and updated map from the 90’s. I am told that as much as several hundred feet of cave may have been added to this system, and I am hoping that is underwater cave feet. I can’t go into it, at least not yet. Without training, this would be a death sentance. I don’t have a death wish, so I will wait for now. I can, however, get into the pond that is in this cave. Since there are no overhead obstructions, I can get into this portion, and I will.

The pond looks to be 75 feet by 30 feet and up to 10 feet deep. That’s fantastic. There is also some life in this pond that may only be found in this particular cave. I need to do more research on that though. I do know that it was at least discussed at one time, whether or not to add a species to the endangered species list that it appears may only be found in this cave. My desire to get into this pond, is to photograph, and to assist my colleague if he goes into this cave.

So that is where I am at right now. I am trying to do a better job of keeping up with this blog, like a journal of sorts. I need to try to write at least every few days.

Denny

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Diving and Money – The politics of the Buddy System.

I was out diving with my good friend Kai over the past weekend; it was Sunday the 4th of September. We were setting up for our second dive when a friend of his came over to give us the revelation I am going to try to quantify here. I thought about it a lot the last few days, because things like this bug me greatly. I don’t know this fella’s name, but he is definitely a very skilled diver. I am thinking he is a tech diving instructor, and on this particular day he was doing tri mix dives (oxygen, helium, and nitrogen). He was also diving solo, and this is where the story spawns from.

There was another fella there on Sunday also, who was diving solo. When you dive solo, this particular quarry makes you rent a locator beacon from them so they know where to find you if something should ‘happen’. The cost of the locator is sixteen dollars. One of the owners, or the owner himself, not sure who exactly owns this place asked him to buddy up with the other solo diver, the fella that was telling us this story said he would, but then wanted the sixteen dollars refunded. The quarry operator declined, citing that it was a bad year.

While relaying this story to us, this diver expounded on the monetary issue and the safety issue. He pointed out that many years ago when new divers were going for their open water certification, a lot of dive shops would make you find a dive buddy to take the class with. From a safety point of view this makes perfect sense, until you stop and think about the fact that when learning to fly a plane and getting your pilots license, the focus is on solo flight. Isn’t it also fairly dangerous in the air? Wouldn’t a second set of eyes, ears, thoughts, etc help a pilot during user error, much as a second diver in this buddy system is a backup for the first?

But …..when you have divers learn in pairs, you sell two sets of dive gear, not just one. If you had pilots learn in pairs, you may only sell one plane. Now don’t get me wrong, I am not faulting the flight industry. I believe they are doing it right. This is a choice that you as an individual make, as far as how much of your own life to take into your own hands. I just believe the dive industry should be the same also.

I go kayaking alone all the time, sometimes when conditions are such that I should not. I, however, am free to make that decision and free to determine my own life’s bad and good choices. I take full responsibility for me. I also hike alone, again, if I fell while running on boulders through the Appalachian trail and badly hurt myself, I could be alone there to starve or whatever, yet there are no checks on the AT (AT is short for Appalachian Trail) to see if you have a buddy with you, just as there are no checks or such requirements for being out in a boat on a river or creek, no matter what the conditions.

Now, all that said, I do feel safer having a buddy with for deeper dives, and prefer that, but that is MY choice. I DO however, have no fear of hoping into 20-30 feet of water and carrying out a dive alone, and even though not certified as a ‘solo diver’ I would not hesitate to do it. If I was staying shallow, there were no overhead obstructions, or any sort of obstructions that looked like I could get caught up in them, I would do it without a second thought. At that shallow depth, I can pop to the surface like a cork with little problem other than perhaps a headache. Not the greatest idea, but in a life or death scenario, something goes horribly wrong with my equipment, it can be done relatively safely.

I do not need a nanny telling me what is right for me. I always learn the risks, and decide for myself. I always have. And when things go wrong, I also take full responsibility on myself.

But hey…..that’s just my two cents worth.